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Where to Go for Care

First Stop = Your Primary Care Provider

Your family doctor or primary care provider knows your medical history and can best care for your medical concerns. Most primary care providers can provide same day care, but if unavailable, Convenient Care or the Emergency Room may be the option for you.

Be sure to check your healthcare coverage regarding Emergency Room visits because reimbursements for some illnesses and injuries may no longer be covered in an emergency room setting.

 

Convenient Care for Minor Injury or Illness

Convenient Care is a good option when your doctor is not available, including evenings, weekends and holidays. Convenient Care can provide treatments on a walk-in basis (without an appointment) for most minor injuries or illnesses, including:

  • Abdominal pain (mild)
  • Allergies and allergic reactions (minor)
  • Asthma attacks (minor)
  • Back pain
  • Breathing problems (minor) and bronchitis
  • Broken bones (minor, not protruding from skin)
  • Burns (minor), including sunburn
  • Colds, cough and sore throat
  • Constipation
  • Cuts (minor), scrapes, bruises and stitches
  • Dehydration (minor)
  • Ear aches
  • Eye infections
  • Fever (If in newborn or if remains high for prolonged period of time, call your doctor or go to the ER.)
  • Flu
  • Foreign bodies in eyes or ears
  • Headaches (migraine and/or typical headache)
  • Heartburn
  • Infections (minor)
  • Joint pain (including arthritis)
  • Rashes
  • Sexually transmitted disease (screening and treatment)
  • Sinus infections
  • Skin infections
  • Sports physicals
  • Sprains and strains
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Viral illness

 

Emergency Department (ER) for Life-threatening Illness or Injury

The Emergency Department should be used to treat life-threatening illness or injury. Go to the nearest Emergency Department for ER for the following:

  • Abdominal pain (severe)
  • Allergic reaction (severe) to food, medication, or insect sting, especially if breathing becomes difficult
  • Bleeding (heavy), does not stop after 10 minutes of pressure
  • Breathing difficulties or shortness of breath (severe)
  • Broken bones (severe or protruding from skin)
  • Burns (severe)
  • Chest pain
  • Coughing up blood (severe)
  • Dizziness
  • Fall from above 5 feet
  • Headache (severe)
  • Head injury (severe, loss of consciousness)
  • Heart attack signs lasting longer than two minutes, which may include chest pain, chest pressure or pain while lightheaded. For women, symptoms could also include pain between the shoulder blades, pain radiating down the arm and nausea.
  • Motor vehicle accident
  • Poisoning
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Spinal injuries
  • Stroke signs, which may include weakness or numbness to the face, arm, or leg on one side of the body, sudden loss of vision, particularly in one eye, or trouble talking.
  • Sudden severe headache, dizziness or weakness on one side of your body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble with vision and/or speech
  • Sudden change in vision
  • Swallowing or foreign object with respiratory problems
  • Wounds (large openings)

Except in the case of life-threatening emergency, please call your family medical doctor before going to the Emergency Department (ER).

Be sure to check your healthcare coverage regarding Emergency Room visits because reimbursements for some illnesses and injuries may no longer be covered in an emergency room setting.

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